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Nike PG 1 performance reviews

Le 18 juillet 2017, 11:59 dans Humeurs 0

Being only the 21st basketball athlete that Nike has awarded a signature model means there are big shoes to fill, and Paul George has his work cut out for him. Let’s see if the Nike PG 1 can hold its own…

Traction – The solid rubber outsole and traction worked above average; the diamond-gridded nodules held their ground on most conditions. That isn’t to say I didn’t have some minor slippage when the pattern picks up big chunks of dust, but one or two wipes and you’re back at it without skipping a beat.

The highlighted area showcases the location of the forefoot Zoom Air unit (the translucent rubber actually showed the Zoom Air section) — it’s something simple, but it’s the little things that matter, especially for us at kd10sale.com. I recommend sticking to the solid rubber outsole for traction consistency.

For those considering using this shoe for outdoors, the durability might not last as long due to the thin nodules.

Cushion – The cushion is bottom-loaded forefoot Zoom Air Unit for the PG1. The Phylon midsole used here is actually softer than most Nike basketball shoes I’ve tested, and the setup was a very responsive low-to-the-ground ride.

You don’t feel the forefoot Zoom unit much, especially for those that are expecting bounce-back, but it gets the job done. For a big man like myself, I do prefer more cushioning — top-loaded Zoom Air in the forefoot and heel, full-length Zoom, or double-stacked Zoom Air units — but I didn’t have a problem with these. I was surprised, especially coming from a recent knee injury. to see how supple the Phylon midsole felt. Forefoot Zoom, soft Phylon midsole, responsive court feel — that combination is definitely a setup worth taking a second look at.

Materials – Drum roll please?! The materials here are absolutely the star of the show. Nubuck midfoot to heel, mesh material transition with fuse overlays on high wear areas from midfoot to toebox, solid rubber traction, footbed strap that is locked down with Flywire, and a bootie construction — superb!

The execution and design was clearly well thought out. There’s a bit of an ol’ school vibe from using good ol’ materials that work on a modern shoe. The materials used on this shoe were incredibly functional; they didn’t add bulk or additional weight to the shoe. Overall, the materials used here are very well implemented and my favorite aspect of the shoe.

Fit – Fit was like a glove, a size too small. The shoe is hella narrow and fits super snug. I lucked on getting a half a size up (because it’s damn near impossible to find a size 13.5). I tried on both my regular size 13 and a size 14. For the size 13, my foot went in, with somewhat semi-violent interaction and mild blood circulation slowly cutting off…then, there was numbness. The size 14 fit my foot fine, with minor struggle getting into the shoe, but there was too much room in the front. So I went on a mission to see if 13.5 was available, a true rarity.

This shoe is specifically catered to the narrow-footed, quick on their feet, shifty players. Even 1/2 size up, the PG1 required some break-in time due to the snugness. After a game or two, the shoe fit like a glove and contoured to my feet exceptionally well. It’s still a concern that not all shoes are created for all athletes alike.

Support – We’re all thrown the idea that low-top shows have less support — which I think a lot of bulls***. Although the shoe does fit snug and requires minor break-in time, the PG1 has the combined support areas placed strategically. The midsole cups your feet, the foot sits well on the footbed, and the bootie construction keeps your feet locked. Additionally, the heel (including the extra padding) wraps around the back of your foot and heel quite well, making sure you’re locked in.

The midsole and outsole are slightly rounded-out but I never felt any instability. The PG1 acts as an extension of your feet without becoming a nuisance. Wonderful lockdown, solid traction, responsive ride — I’d say it’s pretty supportive, especially for a first signature model that is a low-top.

Overall – The PG1 is a wonderful shoe to play in, as long as you don’t have wide feet and you can get your foot into the shoe. For a first signature model and it’s $110 price point, I think the shoe is fantastic.

If you want a nice looking shoe that is responsive on-court with superb containment, this shoe is the beez neez! I suggest going with the solid rubber outsole. If this shoe is an indication of what’s to come from the Swoosh, I’m excited. The PG1 is from the same designer as the Ambassador 9, a hit, so I’ll have to hold him (and Nike) to slightly higher standards and expectations. I’m already anticipating the PG2 — hopefully, it’s wide-foot friendly or releases in size 13.5) — but we’ll just have to wait and see. http://www.kd10sale.com

Most valuable shoes Nike Kyrie 3 performance reviews

Le 17 juillet 2017, 12:10 dans Humeurs 0

Traction – The Nike Kyrie 3 for sale traction was one of the better tractions I’ve played in. It’s hard to upgrade what was already amazing from the Kyrie 2, however, the Swoosh somehow found a way to upgrade.

The shoe utilizes an aggressive herringbone from heel to toe along with what I call heat-mapped pods at the forefoot. Those pods are specifically catered towards the movements of Kyrie, allowing a guard like himself to aggressively change directions without losing any time. The reason I’d say it’s one of the better tractions and not the best is because of the courts I’ve played on.

The X between the traction pods didn’t bite down and grip like I wanted to, as I found myself relying more on the forefoot pods for transitioning movements from change of pace moves. Coming from the spectacular traction of the Ambassador 9 has set the bar quite high, but the Kyrie 3’s traction wasn’t a slouch either.

Cushion – Um…what cushion? It doesn’t take too much to add a more responsive cushion to a shoe. It’s understood the shoe is designed for court feel, but when you come from a large forefoot Zoom unit on the Kyrie 1, and then just using heel cushion from the Kyrie 2, I was expecting more like kd 10 for sale . Yes, the shoe only costs about $120, but some budget models felt better on-foot than these. Nowadays, you don’t have to sacrifice cushioning for court feel at all, and I’m coming from a bigger man perspective.

The impact protection I need wasn’t there, and it took a toll on my body and recovery. You do feel low to the ground with the Phylon midsole, but when I’m going to work down low on the block, grabbing rebounds, landing off lay-ups or jump-shots, I’d like my knees not to feel majority of the impact. If you like low to the ground court feel, this shoe is for you. For those who want responsive cushion feedback on impact, you should consider something else.

Materials – Now we are talking. The big improvement on this pair from last year’s model is the way the materials were utilized. It’s an all mesh shoe, with foam padding along the forefoot flex area. Visible is the Flywire reinforcement, fuse on high wear areas, and Kurim overlay that protects against abrasions. The shoe is minimalistic yet effective in the usage of materials and it worked very well.

Fit – True to size. For those with narrow to regular sized feet, you’ll be fine. For those with super-wide feet, consider 1/2 size up but I do recommend trying these on in store first. If you wear ankle braces I suggest bringing them with you to try the shoe on. The new jordans 2018 felt great from heel to forefoot and there was no deadspace at all. Everything just worked well.

Support – There is an internal shank plate for torsional support, an internal heel counter to keep your foot locked in place, and a rounded outsole. The only thinking lacking in the support is again, the cushion. It was nearly nonexistent on any type of impact for someone of my size.

Another area that I’m not a fan of is the hard-as-a-rock toecap. The area is fused to the point where I feel like if kicked a concrete wall, the wall would crack. I like having a thumb’s length worth of room when playing ball, but on stop and goes my toe would hit the fused toe cap and that s**t hurt. Support is there but the painful toecap and lack of cushioning are downers.

Overall – This was the first Kyrie shoe I was able to fit well for someone with a wide foot base. I did thoroughly enjoy the shoe, particularly the materials and the traction. It’s such a minimalistic shoe that Nike almost had everything working in unison — keyword, almost. More cushion is definitely a much-needed necessity and a well thought-out execution with support would suffice. http://www.kd10sale.com

This is a shoe for players that cut heavily, need minimalistic cushion, and rely on that court-feel. Players, like big men, who need that responsive feedback from the cushioning should look elsewhere. Overall, The Kyrie 3 isn’t a bad shoe, and there is definite room for improvement, but I do like the direction Nike is going with Kyrie’s signature line .

 

AIR JORDAN XXXI LOW PERFORMANCE REVIEW

Le 13 juillet 2017, 12:55 dans Humeurs 0

Does the Air Jordan XXXI Low fair better than its higher cut counterpart? Check out the full performance review to find out.

Traction – It started off just as bad, maybe even worse, than the original version of the Air Jordan XXXI, but once the Low broke in was better with every wear — something that the high top version just never did. I’m not sure if the rubber compound has changed or not but something is definitely different between the two. Dust does get lodged in the crevasses within the outsole but wipe it away and you’ll be good to go. The best word for me to use to explain my experience with the original AJXXXI would be inconsistent. However, the low top rendition is very consistent. It’s a great update to the original shoe; wearers should enjoy their experience in the Low.

Cushion – Nothing has changed between the high and low AJXXXI. Unlocked full-length Zoom Air is used and it’s awesome. It’s low profile cushion that maintains court feel without sacrificing impact protection — exactly why Zoom Air was created. Yes, the heel still has a slight wobble to it during certain foot strikes but once you’re aware of it then you won’t be surprised if you happen to teeter a little bit. Is there room for improvement to this full-length unlocked Zoom setup? Of course. Nothing is perfect. Hopefully it’s refined for the upcoming Air Jordan XXX2 — really excited to see what JB has got cooking. Overall, if you enjoy full-length cushion that doesn’t make you sit too high off the floor then this is a great option.

Materials – Much like the cushion, nothing has changed between the high and low. Performance woven Flyweave is still featured along the forefoot and midfoot, and it transitions to synthetic leather at the heel. This is my ideal setup: free and form fitting up front with a bit more structure in the rear. It feels fantastic on-foot and moves perfectly without restriction or hot spots. No complaints.

Fit – The overall fit is true to size. However, the low tops feel a bit more narrow compared to the original XXXI. I prefer the way the Low fits my foot because I don’t like any dead space in my shoes; snug and secure is just how I like it and that’s what the Low offers.

Lockdown in the Low was nearly identical to what’s found in the high top — other than the tweaks that were made to make the forefoot feel a bit closer to the foot. Midfoot lockdown was solid while the heel was great as well. Yes, I did miss the heel pillows that were on the high top version, but the sculpt and padding placed within the rear of the Low gets the job done perfectly fine.

Support – With the tweaks to the fit, making the forefoot a bit more snug and secure, the support went from good to really good. The support isn’t restrictive but just enough to allow you to maneuver on-court without feeling like you’ve just laced a brick to your foot. I don’t know about you, but I’d say thats a good thing. Unless you like wearing bricks. Then it could be bad.

Overall – I liked the Air Jordan XXXI but I love the Air Jordan XXXI Low. It’s one of my favorite shoes of 2017 so far, and I’m actually looking forward to grabbing a colorway or two for casual use.

If you enjoy woven materials up front and slightly stronger materials in the back atop a low profile bouncy cushion setup then the KD 10 For Sale be the shoe you’re looking for. The traction starts off pretty bad so give it some time to break-in before completely giving up on them.

If you happen to miss out on the Air Jordan XXX1 Low Cal PE when it releases then maybe you can try out a pair of the Air Jordan XXXI Low tops instead. I mean, why not?

Voir la suite ≫