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adidas D Rose 8 performance reviews

Le 7 décembre 2017, 11:39 dans Humeurs 0

adidas D Rose 8 performance reviews

Traction      I wish I could say the traction on the D Rose 8 was as beastly as it was on the D Rose 6 or 7 but it just wasn’t. That was a letdown because traction has always been a strong attribute in the D Rose line. As a player that relied on his speed and agility he needed a shoe that would be able to keep up with him from the ground up.

Some people may say that Rose’s declining health doesn’t require amazing traction or  that adidas has simply given up on Rose and his signature shoe. However, I don’t believe that is the case. Making up excuses for brands isn’t something we do here. adidas designed and released a shoe that doesn’t offer the same level of bite previous versions had, simple as that.

Do I feel the translucent rubber was the cause? No, not this time. It felt like the pattern was the actual issue because it’s aggressive, but it’s also flat. Flat traction rarely works well on all surfaces unless its comprised of some heavy duty rubber.

The rubber used on the Rose 8 is the same tacky stuff that adidas has been using on previous models — all of which have excelled in performance due to the compound and the pattern. This time around, only the rubber compound excelled while the pattern left a little to be desired. It worked really well when it worked and not so well when it didn’t.

Cushion Boost is used on the D Rose 8 and it’s the same exact Boost slab we saw used on the Crazy Light 2016 — which is great. (The Crazy Light 2016’s Boost midsole is my favorite that adidas has offered thus far.) While I enjoyed the low profile setup on the Harden Vol 1 and the plush setup on the Crazy Explosive, there is something about the Crazy Light 2016’s midsole that just feels like its the perfect blend of both.

No, there isn’t that jump out of the gym feeling when wearing them, but you can definitely tell that it’s Boost and that this isn’t just some basic cushion system. It’s top tier cushion in terms of impact protection and it doesn’t sacrifice stability or much court feel.

adidas opted to cage the lateral forefoot with a rubber panel, and just like the Crazy Light 2016, this proved to be a great addition to the midsole because it ensures its lateral stability despite its restriction on that Boost-y feeling. I actually prefer the way this cage played more than the D Rose 7’s forefoot cage, which was the actual outsole wrapping up and around the Boost. On the Rose 8 it felt more fluid and less restrictive but still stable.

If you want a little bit of everything out of your cushion then this might be the setup you’ve been waiting for.

Materials When I mentioned this on Instagram there were some people that took this as a dig on the entire shoe and got a little defensive, even though those people likely didn’t have the shoe themselves, nor did they intend on buying a pair to try out. The D Rose 8 has the worst materials used on a basketball shoe in 2017 other than the Nike Kobe AD Mid.

Now that I’ve said that, the materials worked. So, while I don’t like the materials that were chosen after receiving the D Rose 6 and 7 in wonderful Primeknit variations, they still played well.

The forefoot is primarily mesh with foam acting as the structure. It isn’t anything new but it allowed for a lot of mobility and flexibility in the forefoot area, which is great. But, and there’s always a but, the material choice allowed for the forefoot section to feel like it sat above your foot rather than resting on your foot. This left a lot of dead space in the toebox and if it wasn’t for the plastic rear section of the shoe that has little to no give to it, the overall fit could have been very sloppy. Ventilation was great though, for those wondering.

Now, about that rear section of the upper. Well, that felt like it was ripped right out of 2010 and brought back into the future. We still see fuse used a lot on footwear, but nowadays it’s much more strategically placed; it’s mostly used to merge panels without the use of stitching, or it’s used as a thin overlay to protect high-wear areas and stress zones.

Luckily, this section does break-in and offer a very nice fit — it saved the forefoot from feeling sloppy as hell — so it isn’t a loss. It worked really well on-court, it just isn’t what I like.

Fit Like most adidas models, the shoe doesn’t run perfectly true to size. I went true to size due to the rigid heel and the way it’s sculpted and that worked out for me. If possible, try on the shoe before purchasing, and I’d say that wide footers will likely be okay going true to size with the volume within the toe.

Lockdown, in the midfoot and heel, was fantastic in the D Rose 8. The materials might not be what I like, but as I said above, it worked — and it worked well. This section of the shoe felt like it was a built-in ankle brace without limiting mobility.

Once laced up I felt secure and that is exactly what a wearer would want. If using these materials was the only way adidas could have achieved this type of rear fit then I’d willingly make the sacrifice because it’s a trade that is well worth it.

Support The adidas D Rose 8 has all the support features that you’ve come expect in jordan release date 2018. The heel counter keeps your heel on the footbed and your ankle stable and safe. Remember, real ankle support isn’t collar height, it’s all about heel lockdown and containment.

We’ve seen the same torsional plate used on the Crazy Light 2016; it worked well on that shoe and it works well on the D Rose 8 as well. Stability is also on-point with the wider forefoot and lateral cage around the Boost. Then you have the upper. Yes, fuse is plastic and its a cheap stiff material. However, it does have its benefits and for that it’ll get a pass — although leather could have done the same thing and felt a lot better, just saying.

Overall The adidas D Rose 8 is a very solid shoe. I just don’t think it was as solid as the 6 or 7 in the Primeknit options. I’m still holding out hope that we’ll see a Primeknit edition of the D Rose 8, but I won’t be surprised if we don’t see one at all.

Traction is my main gripe with the Rose 8. I understand wanting to try something new, but adidas knows better. We don’t need funny looking patterns that tell stories. Just give us aggressive herringbone that works. On the bright side, everything from the midsole up worked really well and I would recommend the Rose 8 when it goes on newjordans2018.com sale.

Nike LeBron 15 Ashes Performance Review

Le 6 décembre 2017, 11:22 dans Humeurs 0

After weeks of testing, the Nike LeBron 15 Ashes Performance Review is here.

Traction was solid for the most part. You can feel the triangle pattern bite and grip the court really well from a linear standpoint. Unfortunately, laterally I can’t say the same. The way the pattern is implemented seems to be straight across the surface. If some portions of the pattern were turned a bit I feel lateral coverage would’ve had that same bite that it offers linearly.

While I did play in a pair (for a very short time) that featured clear soles, the court I had played on was one of the most pristine surfaces I’ve had the pleasure of encountering. To be safe, rather than sorry, I’d opt for solid rubber. I know there are some killer colorways releasing that use translucent rubber that will be more enticing than some of the offerings that use solid rubber, but (there’s always a but) just keep in mind that if my pair with solid rubber didn’t offer as much bite laterally as it could have, imagine what it’d be like on a “normal” surface and the translucent rubber outsole.

I would not recommend playing in the LeBron 15 Ashes outdoors. Exposed Air units almost always pop once the outsole grinds down to the cushion’s surface and the rubber used here is soft, so it’ll likely happen sooner rather than later.

Beast mode! If you’re a cushion-above-all-else type of player then you’ll love these. The bounce and feedback felt from the Zoom units is incredible. This isn’t the first time this type of cushion has been utilized in a LeBron model (the last time was the LeBron 10) but articulation is present this time around so overall mobility has greatly increased.

Is the setup perfect? While it’s as close as it’s ever been, it still has some issues. Lateral stability — while a bit better than the LBJ10 due to wrapping the front portion of the Air unit in Phylon — could benefit from the implementation of an actual outrigger. I’m not sure why there isn’t a true outrigger on a shoe that rides on a platform made of Air, but that’s what we’ve got to work with here.

If you’re a linear player, like LeBron, then you shouldn’t have many issues with stability and support. However, if you move laterally often then you’ll likely feel the instability and it’ll hinder your on court performance. It caused me to hesitate instead of moving as I normally would around the court.

I believe the tooling could be the cause of LeBron’s recent ankle issues. While he usually sprints from one end of the floor to the other, there are times when he’ll move laterally. The tippy nature of the LeBron 15s tooling will be loud and clear when someone moves laterally in them — and you can see LeBron’s body jerk a bit to recover.

A wider setup or a larger outrigger could likely resolve the issues I’ve been experiencing. I hope we see something on the LeBron 16 that adds lateral stability while retaining all of the awesomeness that is Max Zoom Air.

Battleknit is used here (aka really thick Flyknit) and it feels awesome on-foot. If you were unimpressed with the stiff upper used on the new jordans 2018 and the cheap but soft materials used on the LeBron 14, you may find that the material choice on the LeBron 15 Ashes offers a happy balance between the two.

Some areas of the knit are thicker than others while high wear areas are glued a bit for durability. Once on-foot I felt comfortable and secure, and if you’ve worn Flyknit hoop shoes before you’ll feel the evolution throughout the years.

I went down half size from my true size in the LeBron 15 Ashes due to the materials and build of the upper. One piece uppers can be tricky to get just right and I’d rather have them be a little snug than a bit too loose — especially with the tooling setup the way it is. Trying them on in-store is the best option, and make sure to bring your brace or orthotics with you to ensure everything works.

Lockdown was surprisingly nice from heel to toe. While the lacing structure relies solely on Flywire, it did its job rather well. The top “eyelet” or Flywire cable draws the heel into the rear section of the shoe nicely while additional heel padding takes care of the rest.

Once you’re in the LeBron 15 and laced up, especially if you opt for going down half size, you’ll be locked in and ready to go.

Support in the LeBron 15 is a bit lackluster due to the tooling setup. Traditional support features like a torsional midfoot shank and TPU heel counter are all in place and work well. Hwoever, the midsole and outsole lack a wide enough base and it really hurt the lateral stability and overall support. Again, if you’re a linear player then you should be fine. If you move around laterally then you may have the same experience I had in them.

I love pieces of the LeBron 15 Ashes . Materials and fit are highlights, and the cushion is the best Nike has offered in years. Stability made them a bit concerning for me while on the floor and I never ended up feeling as comfortable as I wanted to be.

If you’re willing to sacrifice lateral stability in lieu of cushion then you’ll enjoy the LeBron 15 Ashes immensely. If you’re a low profile player that roams the floor and curls off screens to get an open look at the basket then you may want something a bit different go to newjordans2018.com

adidas Crazy Explosive Low Performance Review

Le 2 décembre 2017, 05:32 dans Humeurs 0

adidas Crazy Explosive Low Performance Review

Nothing has changed between the high and the low top in the traction department. The coral pattern that adidas used before is used once again, and like last time, I love it; it’s multi-directional and hugs the floor better than you’d expect. Yes, the rubber compound is still on the soft side, so play outdoors at the risk of burning through the traction rather quickly. However, while you have traction you’ll have some really good traction.

Cushion - Much like the traction, cushion on the Crazy Explosive Low White hasn’t changed at all. #BoostIsLife (for me) and I love how these feel on-court. As I said previously, this is the UltraBoost of basketball. You’re getting full-length cushion that is plush in the heel and a little thinner in the forefoot so you don’t sacrifice too much court feel. TPU is still wrapped around the lateral side of the midsole to ensure the Boost remains stable; it’s exposed on the medial end which allows the Boost to expand and contract while you’re playing.

Materials - This is the first time I’ve used (what I call) the “basic” version of the Crazy Explosive. This Crazy Explosive Low uses a micro mesh upper whereas I’ve only played in the Primeknit edition. Performance wise, you’re not sacrificing anything if you choose this option. In this particular situation the Primeknit version of the shoe is more of a luxury rather than a performance upgrade. If you wanted something a little nicer looking and feeling then opt for the Primeknit version, but if you’re only interested in performance and enjoy saving a few bucks then you won’t be missing anything by grabbing the regular versions.

The mesh upper feels like Lycra (a stretchy material, what most leggings are made of). It’s light, breathable, and wraps around your foot like no other. You’ve basically got a superhero costume on your foot — pretty cool if you ask me. There are fuse welds in high-wear areas to help protect the material because durability isn’t its strong suit. However, if you try on the Crazy Explosive Low and take it for a spin I assure you that you won’t feel like you should’ve waited and gone with the Primeknit model — this is just as good.

Fit - The fit is incredible. Just like the high, the Crazy Explosive Low fits true to size and feels wonderful on-foot. It isn’t suffocating and it feels very secure. Due to the material, you almost feel as if you don’t have anything on at all.

Lockdown is great as well and there is no slipping inside the shoe whatsoever. adidas promoted the CrazyLight Boost to be the best fitting low top shoe ever, but the brand outdid itself with the Crazy Explosive Low — these fit like a dream.

Support -  Everything the high top version has the low top version has, save for some extra material around the ankle. Torsional shank, internal heel counter, large outrigger, flat stable base — everything you need in a shoe is in the Crazy Explosive Low. Everything.

Overall - The way I feel about the adidas Crazy Explosive Low is the same way I felt about the Air Jordan XX9 Low. Both are so much nicer to wear than their original versions — and the original versions of each shoe were already really good.

You aren’t giving up anything by going with the Crazy Explosive Low. Traction? Check. Cushion? Check. Nice materials? Check. Great lockdown and fit? Check. Support? Check. Nothing was left out of these. Well, maybe overall durability, but if you play indoors I don’t think that’ll be a huge issue on newjordans2018.com

The adidas Crazy Explosive Low is the definition of “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

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